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Children's pensions

Pensions are also payable to any of your eligible children.

The amount of pension depends on the number of children you have and is usually based upon a proportion of your deferred pension, or a notional deferred pension based on 10 years membership (pro-rated for part-timers), whichever is best, but it can never be more than the membership you would have built up by age 65. If your deferred pension has been subject to a reduction following a divorce or dissolution of a civil partnership, a child's pension is based on the full (unreduced) deferred pension.

If your husband, wife or civil partner is receiving a pension, one child would receive ¼ of your pension, while two or more children would receive ½ between them.

If your husband, wife or civil partner is not receiving a pension, one child would receive 1/3 of your pension, while two or more children would receive 2/3 between them.

If you have more than one child, your pension fund administrator will decide how to share the children’s pension between them.

The pension may be reduced if your child is receiving pay while in full-time training for a trade, profession or vocation.

Employees in England and Wales who left after 31 March 2008: if you die with deferred benefits in the LGPS, the benefits payable are different. 

Employees and councillors in Scotland who left after 31 March 2009: if you die with deferred benefits in the LGPS, the benefits payable are different.

Employees in England and Wales - if you left after 31 March 2008

Employees and Councillors in Scotland - if you left the LGPS after 31 March 2009

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